3 Days 3 Quotes Tag – Day 3

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The last day of my 3 Days 3 Quotes Tag. Yesterday I posted a quote from The Fault in our Stars. The day before that I chose a quote from Jane Eyre. You can find the first quote and the rules of this tag at 3 Days 3 Quotes Tag – Day 1. Today I chose a quote from an epic fantasy novel written by Patrick Rothfuss. In many novels across genres life lessons are present. Sometimes the novel is drenched with it, but most often it is just there in a few lines. Those few words can have an emotional impact and make you contemplate about if and how it corresponds to your life.

Quote Day 3 – The Name of the Wind

“You see, there’s a fundamental connection between seeming and being. Every Fae child knows this, but you mortals never seem to see. We understand how dangerous a mask can be. We all become what we pretend to be. […] It’s like everyone tells a story about themselves inside their own head. Always. All the time. That story makes you what you are. We build ourselves out of that story” (657-658).

The phrase ‘Fake it till you make it’ immediately pops into my mind when reading this quote. However this quote from The Name of the Wind is a warning; if you put on a mask it may change you for better or worse. It is not hard to imagine there is truth in this quote. You can pretend to be a certain person to gain a positive trait, such as confidence, but society can also cloak you with their ideas of who they think you are. If you start believing in their views of you, it might affect your reality. It is therefore crucial to keep reminding yourself it is your story and you are the one who tells it. If you want to change go ahead, but never let anyone make that decision for you.

Today’s nominees:

Rothfuss, Patrick. The Name of the Wind. London: Gollancz, 2007.

3 Days 3 Quotes Tag – Day 2

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I love to discover and rediscover wonderful quotes. On Pinterest I collect all kinds of texts. From books, movies, songs, people like you and me, and so on. Some to inspire, give courage, lift my spirits or just make me laugh. When I have an off day, reading my collection of Pinterest quotes always makes me feel better and gets my hopes up. Yesterday I shared a quote from Jane Eyre. Check out this quote and the rules at 3 Days 3 Quotes Tag – Day 1. Today I chose a beautifully written quote from a contemporary love story.

Quote Day 2 – The Fault in our Stars

“There are infinite numbers between 0 and 1. There’s .1 and .12 and .112 and an infinite collection of others. Of course, there is a bigger infinite set of numbers between 0 and 2, or between 0 and a million. Some infinities are bigger than other infinities. A writer we used to like taught us that. There are days, many of them, when I resent the size of my unbounded set. I want more numbers than I’m likely to get, and God, I want more numbers for Augustus Waters than he got. But, Gus, my love, I cannot tell how thankful I am for our little infinity. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. You gave me a forever within the numbered days” (260).

Some people in our life make a bigger impact than others do. It is not about the quantity of time spent together, it is the quality that matters. An hour spent with your best friend can be more memorable than a week spent with someone else. Although we don’t have an equal amount of time on earth and although we are not able to spend as much time with the people we love as we would have liked, it is important to treasure the time we are able to be together.

Today’s nominees:

Green, John. The Fault in our Stars. United States: Dutton Books, 2012.

3 Days 3 Quotes Tag – Day 1

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Maja @ MayaTheBookExplorer nominated me for the 3 Days 3 Quotes Tag. If you are looking for honest and smashing reviews, go check out Maja’s blog.

I’ve been wanting to do this tag for ages, but I couldn’t really find the courage to start. Since I am a perfectionist, I put way too much pressure on choosing the perfect quotes. Until yesterday that is. Instead of choosing one of Tolkien’s or J.K. Rowling’s books to quote from (books with in my opinion brilliant quotes), I decided to just walk to my bookcase and pick three books from three different genres. In every book I love there is a quote that strikes a chord with me and I often jot down these quotes in my notebook. I am really fond of the quotes I chose and I hope you enjoy them as well.

The Rules

  1. Thank the person who nominated you.
  2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day).
  3. Nominate three new bloggers each day.

To the bloggers I’ve nominated: please feel free to ignore the nomination if you don’t want to do this tag.

Quote Day 1 – Jane Eyre

“Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.” (129-130).

Jane Eyre is a highly quotable novel. I found it difficult choosing the quote I liked most, but considering current affairs this one seemed appropriate. As the Women’s March of last week demonstrated, it is still key to focus on gender issues and strive for equality in the present day. The issues addressed in Jane Eyre, a novel written by a woman about a woman, were way ahead of its time. This quote speaks for itself. When read out loud, it sounds so powerful and strong.

Today’s nominees:

Brontë, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. London, etc.: Penguin Classics, 2006.

Book review | The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman

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rating-2-stars

“The being chased by hellhounds and blowing things up was a comparatively unimportant part of the job. Getting the books, now that was what really mattered to her. That was the whole point of the Library […] It was about finding unique works of fiction, and saving them in a place out of time and space” (16).

An enthusiastic comment of one of the employees of my local bookstore on a wrapper convinced me to buy this novel about a library that is a world on its own. The Invisible Library contains loads of books, magic and mystery. It sounds fascinating, doesn’t it? Unfortunately this book did not meet my expectations at all.

Irene works for the Library with a capital L. Her job is to collect books from alternate worlds and bring them safely to the Library. She and her assistant Kai go to an alternative London to retrieve a book. Sadly it is stolen before they arrive and their mission only seems to go downhill from there.

The Invisible Library seems to have all the ingredients for a good story: a courageous heroine, a handsome and mysterious man, a dangerous mission set in a Steampunk reality, an evil villain, supernatural creatures and of course magic. Still it somehow doesn’t work. While I did find the plot interesting enough, I was simply not captivated.

More importantly, much in the book puzzled me. I did not feel connected with the main character or any of the other characters for that matter. I had trouble grasping their emotions and thoughts. When the characters gave each other looks, I quite often did not know what it was meant to portray. Furthermore, I felt like I was frequently given explanations about this strange universe three chapters late if I got an explanation at all.

It could be Cogman’s writing style is not my cup of tea. The only reason I finished this book is, because I brought it with me on the train and didn’t have anything better to do. I found this quite a frustrating read. Has anyone of you tried this book?

Cogman, Genevieve. The Invisible Library. London: Tor, 2015.

Book review | The Graces by Laure Eve

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rating-5-stars

“Everyone said they were witches. I desperately wanted to believe it. I’d only been at this school a couple of months, but I saw how it was. They moved through corridors like sleek fish, ripples in their wake, stares following their backs and their hair” (1).

It is simply impossible to put down this book once you start reading. I started it on Christmas Eve and couldn’t tear myself away from it on Christmas Day (much to the annoyance of my family, since we were doing a Harry Potter marathon). I might have missed most of the first and third film, but I did finish this awesome book.

The Graces are said to be witches. What else could they be with their beauty, wealth and carefree lives? The three Grace children, fifteen-year-old Summer and seventeen-year-old Thalia and Fenrin, are the most popular kids in school. Each Grace is unique in their own way and everyone in town is enthralled by them. River, new in town with a past full of dark secrets, is just as obsessed with the Graces as everyone else is and she desperately wants to get noticed by Fenrin Grace. However being friends with a  Grace might not be forever and it is key to keep in mind the higher you climb the harder you may fall.

The big question I had while reading this book was: are the Graces actually witches? Nothing really extraordinary happens in most of the novel. It makes you question if the novel is about the dangers of human obsession instead of witchcraft. The Graces portrays teenage angst and high school social dynamics accurately. It was recognizable and I am relieved I don’t have to go through high school ever again. Although sometimes a work environment can resemble high school quite a lot.

The story is told from a first-person perspective. Still River was a mystery to me. What frightened me was how clearly obsessed she was with wanting to fit in. What boundaries would she dare cross to stay in the Graces inner circle? Although she mentions her past, she does not unfold it until the very end. River’s got one hell of a revelation in store for the reader.

Prepare yourself for a great twist. Prepare yourself to be hooked. This is one wicked read you will enjoy immensely. The sequel will be released in September. That is a long wait…

Eve, Laure. The Graces. London: Faber & Faber, 2016.

Book review | The Little Shop of Happy Ever After by Jenny Colgan

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rating-3-stars

“The problem with good things that happen is that very often they disguise themselves as awful things. It would be lovely, wouldn’t it, whenever you’re going through something difficult, if someone could just tap you on the shoulder and say ‘Don’t worry, it’s  completely worth it’ ” (1).

Some books you just have to read with tea and mini chocolate muffins  (my favourite) within easy reach on your table or nightstand. Jenny Colgan’s The Little Shop of Happy Ever After is so sweet it will give you a sugar high. If you are not into those happy ever after romance novels, I don’t recommend this book.

I however do on occasion enjoy a good chick lit and, though a chick lit novel does not require deep thinking, it does lift your spirits on the rainiest of days. In Jenny Colgan’s message to her readers, she notes “this book is about reading and books, and how these things can change your life […] for the better” (ix). Some books get you thinking or they teach you something. Others, such as this one, are like security blankets; they make the world a little brighter.

In The Little Shop of Happy Ever After, twenty-nine-year-old Nina loses her job at the local library. Though she was never a risk taker, Nina decides to start a mobile bookshop in the Scottish Highlands. Shy Nina soon finds herself in an adventurous romance, but it might just be her dashing new man is too good to be true.

A protagonist who loves to read. A bookshop. An adventurous turn in life. The Scottish Highlands. Check, check, check, check. All these things excite me. I started and finished this book on the train from Amsterdam to Berlin. Since I travelled alone, this book was lovely company. I suggest to read this book when you want to feel good, because Nina’s story will without a doubt make you smile.

Colgan, Jenny. The Little Shop of Happy Ever After. London: Sphere, 2016.

The Versatile Blogger Award

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Hi everyone!

Thank you Jasmine @ How Useful It Is and Vivian Parkin Derosa @ Writing with Style for nominating me for the Versatile Blogger Award! I am super stoked! Jasmine nominated me in August and Vivian nominated me in October. Unfortunately it took me a while to put the award up. Sorry about that!

The rules

  • Display award
  • Thank the person who gave this award (and include a link to their blog)
  • Share seven things about yourself
  • Nominate ten bloggers

Seven facts about me

  1. My favourite days are those rainy Sundays when the only thing you can do is basically read, drink hot chocolate and listen to music.
  2. Ever since I visited Scotland I am obsessed with puffins.
  3. I own quite a lot of mugs and always choose one that fits my mood.
  4. I love old photographs. The colours. The varying sizes. The material. I would like to be able to create photos with that vintage feel. I know there are many vintage style filters, but it isn’t the same.
  5. I seem to collect an inordinate amount of inspirational quotes on Pinterest. I collect a lot of things on Pinterest: animal pictures, DIY projects, home inspiration, recipes. Don’t you just love you can collect stuff without actually owning them?
  6. Impatiently waiting on A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas. The title already set me pondering.
  7. I grew up in a thatched roof farmhouse (no animals, except for cats). Love cats!

I nominate the following blogs:

If you have already done this award or if you don’t want to do it, no pressure. If you do decide to put this award up, please let me know. I would like to read your seven facts.

Have a wonderful day everyone!

Marianne